The Cost Of Charging An Electric Car At Home Revealed

Get the cost per charge along with the cost per mile, month and year of running an average electric car. And see how you can cut your charging costs in half with 6 simple tips.

Most people charge their electric cars at home. But how much does this actually cost?

On average, in the US, it costs $5.59 to charge a standard electric car at home. It costs just 4 cents per mile, $50.51 per month and $606.15 per year to run an electric car, on average, in the US.

It’s even cheaper to charge an electric car in Canada, but it’s considerably more expensive in the UK.

Continue reading to get details about these calculations and see how much it costs to charge an electric car at home in 24 different countries. Also, find out the cost per mile, month and year to run the average electric car.

If you’d like to work out your own costs, use the Electric Car Electricity Cost Calculator here.

Cost of charging an electric car at home image with electric car parked in garden | Eco Cost Savings

How to work out the cost of charging an electric car at home

To work out the average cost of charging an electric car at home (for a single charge, and for for 1 full month and year of charging) we need 4 figures:

  1. The average electric car battery capacity (i.e. how much electricity, on average, EV batteries will hold)
  2. The average kWh per mile (i.e. how much electricity, on average, electric cars will use to travel 1 mile)
  3. The average unit price of electricity (i.e. the cost for 1 kWh of electricity that energy suppliers charge)
  4. The average distance travelled per year by drivers (i.e. how many miles, on average, an electric car will travel per year)

As most EV charging is done at home, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, let’s disregard the cost of charging at public charging stations. There are also many other factors that will impact the cost, such as driving style, terrain, temperature, time of day that you charge, battery age, EV efficiency, weight of contents, etc. But the below should give you an idea of what the average EV owner should expect to spend on electricity.

1. Average battery capacity of electric cars

The average battery capacity for electric vehicles worldwide is 43kWh. This is expected to increase to 45kWh in 2025.

Source: Statista research.

For context, the following is a list of the battery capacity of some popular EVs:

  • Tesla Model S: 40kWh – 100kWh
  • Tesla Model 3: 50kWh – 75kWh
  • Nissan Leaf: 24kWh – 62kWh
  • Chevrolet Volt: 16kWh – 18.4kWh

So now that we have our 1st figure, 43kWh, let’s get our second figure.

2. Average electric car kWh per mile

On average, electric cars consume 34.6kWh per 100 miles (or 0.346kWh per mile).

This is based on research of over 230 electric cars built between 2000 and 2021.

Get more details about my research into the average electric car kWh per mile, including the most and least efficient electric cars.

See the data: Electric Car kWh Per Mile List [277 kWh/Mile Listed].

So our second figure is 0.346kWh – electric cars, on average, use 34.6kWh to travel 100 miles, which works out as 0.346kWh per mile.

3. The average unit price of electricity 

To work out the cost of charging an electric car, we need to know how much 1kWh of electricity costs.

In the US the average cost per kWh is 13 cents, while in the UK it’s 22 cents (17p). 

Below, is a table with the average price per kWh across 24 different countries (source). Prices are in USD so, out of interest, we can see how the costs compare.

CountryAverage kWh price (USD)
Germany$0.33
Belgium$0.28
Italy$0.27
Portugal$0.26
Spain$0.24
Austria$0.23
Japan$0.22
United Kingdom$0.22
Sweden$0.21
New Zealand$0.20
France$0.19
Colombia$0.18
Netherlands$0.18
Finland$0.17
Poland$0.16
Turkey$0.15
Brazil$0.13
United States$0.13
South Korea$0.12
Canada$0.11
Indonesia$0.10
South Africa$0.09
China$0.08
India$0.08

So now that we have the average cost per kWh, 13 cents in the US, we just need our fourth and final figure.

4. The average distance travelled per year by drivers

According to the United States Department of Transportation – Federal Highway Administration, the average distance travelled per year by US drivers is 13,476 miles.

While this figure will vary by person and country, it’s a reliable average figure that we can use to work out the cost of charging an electric car, monthly and annually.

Related post: List Of Electric Cars By Range [277 Ranges Listed].

Cost of charging an electric car at home – data summary

To summarize, below is a list of the figures and the sources used to work out the average cost of charging an electric car at home.

  1. The average electric car battery capacity is 43kWh (source)
  2. The average kWh per mile is 0.346kWh (source)
  3. The average unit price of electricity in the US is 13 cents, but the relevant unit costs listed above will be used for each country (source)
  4. The average distance travelled per year by drivers is 13,476 – this is US based research, but the figure will be used across all of the countries listed (source)

Again, there are many variables that will impact costs. Averages from reliable sources are used to give you a good idea of the costs to run an electric car.

So now that we have our 4 figures, we can easily work out the average cost of charging an electric car at home.

Average cost of charging an electric car at home

The table below shows the average cost of charging an electric car across 24 different countries. The cost is broken down into cost per charge, monthly charging costs and expected annual charging costs for each country.

CountryCost per chargeCost per mileMonthly costAnnual cost
Germany$14.19$0.11$128.22$1,538.69
Belgium$12.04$0.10$108.80$1,305.55
Italy$11.61$0.09$104.91$1,258.93
Portugal$11.18$0.09$101.03$1,212.30
Spain$10.32$0.08$93.25$1,119.05
Austria$9.89$0.08$89.37$1,072.42
Japan$9.46$0.08$85.48$1,025.79
UK$9.46$0.08$85.48$1,025.79
Sweden$9.03$0.07$81.60$979.17
New Zealand$8.60$0.07$77.71$932.54
France$8.17$0.07$73.83$885.91
Colombia$7.74$0.06$69.94$839.29
Netherlands$7.74$0.06$69.94$839.29
Finland$7.31$0.06$66.05$792.66
Poland$6.88$0.06$62.17$746.03
Turkey$6.45$0.05$58.28$699.40
Brazil$5.59$0.04$50.51$606.15
US$5.59$0.04$50.51$606.15
South Korea$5.16$0.04$46.63$559.52
Canada$4.73$0.04$42.74$512.90
Indonesia$4.30$0.03$38.86$466.27
South Africa$3.87$0.03$34.97$419.64
China$3.44$0.03$31.08$373.02
India$3.44$0.03$31.08$373.02

The costs listed above are based on travelling the average US driving distance (13,476 miles) in an electric car that has the average battery capacity (43kWh), which also achieves the average kWh per mile (0.346kWh/mi). The average cost per unit for each country was also used. Prices are in USD.

See how much it costs per mile to drive 277 different models of electric cars, here.

Interestingly, the EPA’s Fuel Economy Labels base their figures off 15,000 miles driven per year. This is above the average distance according to the United States Department of Transportation – Federal Highway Administration.

As a result, cost savings noted on the Fuel Economy Labels are slightly higher than average by default. Not that I’m complaining! I just thought it was interesting.

Not interested in the cost based on averages? Get your specific charging costs, use the Electric Car Electricity Cost Calculator.

Cost of charging an electric car at home US

As can be seen in the table above, the US is the 7th cheapest country on our list to charge an electric car at home.

On average, in the US, it costs $5.59 to charge a standard electric car at home. It costs just 4 cents per mile, $50.51 per month and $606.15 per year to run an electric car, on average, in the US.

As mentioned previously, many factors come into play that impact the cost. Continue reading to see how you can minimize the cost of charging your electric car, and how you can reduce your carbon footprint even more.

But first let’s take a look at our neighbour to the north.

Cost of charging an electric car at home Canada

Based on the same factors, it’s even cheaper to charge an electric car at home in Canada compared to the US. Canada is the 5th cheapest country on our list, 2 places lower/cheaper than the US.

In Canada, on average, it costs $4.73 USD ($6.25 CAD) to charge an electric car at home. 

In terms of distance, Canadians can expect to pay $0.04 USD ($0.05 CAD) in electricity per mile driving an average electric car. This works out at $42.74 USD ($56.50 CAD) per month and $512.90 USD ($678.07 CAD) per year, driving the average distance that drivers travel in the US.

But what about the costs at the other side of the pond?

Cost of charging an electric car at home UK

The UK is the 8th most expensive country on our list to charge an electric car.

On average, in the UK, it costs $9.46 (£7.27) to charge an electric car at home. 

It costs $0.08 (6p) in electricity per mile to drive an average electric car in the UK. If driving the average distance of 13,476 miles per year, UK EV owners can expect to pay $85.48 (£65.65) per month and $1,025.79 (£787.86) per year charging a standard electric car at home.

Cost of charging an electric car vs gas

As I mentioned, there are so many variables that impact the cost of charging and running an electric car. Driving behaviour, such as the distance you typically travel, is one of the key factors.

But there is one overarching fact (unless you drive a 2001 or 2002 Ford Explorer USPS Electric), the cost of charging an electric car is significantly cheaper compared to fueling a car with gas.

To get a better idea about the cost of charging an electric car under your own driving conditions, instead of using averages, use the tool below. You’ll also see a gas comparison under the same conditions.

Enter your driving habits, or use the default averages, in the US Department Of Energy’s tool to see how much the cost of charging an electric car compares to the cost of gas.

Cost of charging other electric vehicles at home

There are many different types of EVs, but one that is growing rapidly in popularity is the electric bike.

Compared to an electric car, electric bikes cost significantly less to charge and run. Under the same factors, such as distance travelled and unit cost, electric bike owners in the US can expect to pay just 3.5% of the running cost of electric cars.

Get more details about the cost of charging an electric bike along with 8 easy ways to reduce your eBike charging costs.

The charging cost of electric scooters are even lower than electric bikes. Check out the cost per charge, mile and year for electric scooters.

6 simple tips to reduce the cost of charging your electric car at home

  1. Charge at night. Many energy suppliers offer reduced unit rates during off peak hours. If you’re on a relevant tariff you can make considerable savings. If not, inquire about an off-peak electricity plan with your electricity provider. This can easily half your charging costs (FYI – my supplier’s off-peak rate means that I’d save 75% on charging costs).
  2. Use an efficient EV charging station. Level 2 EVSE chargers continue to consume electricity even on idle. Be sure to use an Energy Star certified charger to help keep this wastage low. The current #1 Best Seller on Amazon.com, ChargePoint Home Flex Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger, is extremely efficient in this regard. It also enables you to easily set charging to off-peak times only, so you can ensure that you avail of the significantly cheaper rates. Using this off-peak charging automation could mean that this charger would pay for itself in 2 years (excluding installation costs). The costs can also be offset by federal and state incentives.
  3. Reduce your expenses with federal / state / utility incentives. For example, the Plug-In Electric Drive Vehicle Credit ranges between $2,500 and $7,500. Search federal and state laws and incentives here.
  4. Consider changing energy supplier. Many providers offer considerable discounts to entice new customers. Switching energy supplier can be a quick and easy way to reduce the cost of charging electric cars, and your overall bill.
  5. Maintain your car and battery. Keeping your car and battery at peak performance will keep your car running smoothly, which obviously helps keep your charging costs down.
  6. Drive conservitavely. The more you need to charge your battery, the more expensive your electricity bills will be. Rapid acceleration, for example, can consume a lot of electricity. Being conscientious about your driving can help keep your car running for longer distances on a single charge. Less charging results in less expense.

Bonus environmental cost saving tip:

  • Charge with green energy. While this will increase your electricity costs (by just a few cents per kWh) it will reduce the environmental costs. Charging at off-peak rates will offset this $ cost, and more. eia.gov notes that about 63% of electricity in the US is generated from burning fossil fuels. Given that around 50% of US consumers have access to green energy from their suppliers, we could reduce our carbon footprint considerably while still saving on fuel costs compared to gas.

Final thoughts

The cost of charging an electric car at home ranges between $3-$15 for a single charge. At 3-11 cents per mile, electric cars can save you a lot on fuel every year.

There’s an opportunity for EV owners to reduce their carbon footprint even more by charging with green energy. Overall, while slightly more expensive, the cost savings on fuel are still substantial, especially if smart charging and of off-peak electricity price plans are used.

If you’re interested in exploring another opportunity to reduce your bills and carbon footprint even more – check out the cost of charging an electric bike, here.

To estimate your own costs, use the Electric Car Electricity Cost Calculator.